Regular expression for validating url in javascript chad duell dating


18-Aug-2017 07:19

regular expression for validating url in javascript-48

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In the case of a URL, finding a regular expression that validates every type of URL possible is very difficult.Even more if you manage to find one, the regular expression will be highly complex. :[a-z\u00a1-\uffff0-9]-*)*[a-z\u00a1-\uffff0-9] )*(? Code can be found at: https://github.com/garycourt/uri-js I changed it a little bit so that it's valid in Ruby. Here are some failure scenarios: Putting it against @amon's test cases yields these results: Stuff in parentheses isn't captured, nor IPV6 IP's. You should read the appropriate RFCs which contain relevant parts of the grammar.

// Regular expression for URLs // Based on // Improved to only pickup links begining with http https ftp ftps mailto and www $regex = "_(? The above is also true for decimal notations, various forms of IPV6 URLs and other "non-human" URLs. It uses a much larger regular expression then this one. It is easy to just remove the unwanted parts of the validation to fit different scopes (length, precision) so I will probably add more options like the list of existing TLD (possibly grouped), the list of existing protocols and/or a fall back for a more generic protocol match too. my Java Script URI parsing library does strict URI validation as per RFC 3986. The gist have been corrected/updated so it doesn't lock up Chrome Javascript. |1\d\d|2[0-4]\d|25[0-4]))" rxs = rxs "|" 'host name rxs = rxs "(?

regular expression for validating url in javascript-25

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Now the tests do not lock up Chrome and it also seem the overall speed for URL validation is faster. )*[a-z\u00a1-\uffff0-9] )" 'domain name rxs = rxs "(? If you look to the one liner regular expression there is no place where a backslash need to be escaped. This is my suggested fix: The patterns for username/password are overly lax and allow you to put in almost anything as a url, if you finish with something that looks like @ /@example.com") @gburtini Actually although browsers allow and resolve URLs with IP addresses that are in hexadecimal, octal or without a dot-notation, these formats are made invalid in a URL by RFC 3986: https://org/rfc/rfc3986section $regex = '_^(?

" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" q=Spaces should be encoded") Ok @form Validators.uri("//") Ok @form Validators.uri("//a") Ok @form Validators.uri("///a") Ok @form Validators.uri("///") Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri("foo.com") Ok @form Validators.uri("rdar://1234") Ok @form Validators.uri(" shouldfail.com") Ok @form Validators.uri(":// should fail") Ok @form Validators.uri(" quux") Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" Ok @form Validators.uri(" @dsgn1graphics, I suggest you check your tests and/or the port of the Regular Expression you are currently using. However I disagree about having patterns that will never be typed by users like "IPV6" and "Puny Code".